Reading strangely amusing books: Peril in the Old Country, by Sam Hooker


Sometimes you just need to find a book that is very different from your every day reads. I’m not just talking about the theme. It’s more than that. It’s the humor, the descriptions, the ending. You will probably wonder how you can find such a book. Well, luckily I might be able to help you with that. So, here’s what I just finished reading.

Let me introduce you to Sloot Peril

Sloot is an anxious, law abiding citizen of the Old Country, a devoted accountant, and a loyal subordinate to the Domnitor – long may he reign. No way would he ever have anything to do with his country’s greatest enemy, Carpathia, thank you very much. He is as loyal as a loyal citizen can be, Oath declared every day and all.

But everything is about to change

An accounting report, however, is about to change all that. Sloot becomes a dinner guest of Lord Hapsgalt, one of the most powerful, and vastly rich people in the country. And that is where everything goes terribly, terribly wrong. That’s the part when he learns he’s a Carpathian, meets a bunch of very peculiar people, and finds his bravery. It’s also the part where he gets in grave danger. And, let’s not forget, Sloot wants nothing to do with any of these things.


Welcome to the Old Country

whose true name is never pronounced, and where goblins are a real threat. This is the land where no one can swear, lines in Public Services are bound to be long – or else one would get the wrong impression- and freedom is not a word the citizens are quite familiar with. Nevertheless, it beats the neighboring country, Carpathia, where citizens are complete savages, beating people up and killing for no reason. Or is all this just tale tell?


This is a witty tale,full of creatively constructed countries and peculiar heroes. Much more humane than in mostly other heroic tales, the people you meet in Sloot’s story are genuinely real. They’re not made of steel, and so they can, too, experience fear and agony, and still be heroic in their own way. From a crazy old nanny to the ruler of the great and mighty Carpathia, each one offers an abundance of laughter, witty remarks, and snappy remarks. Twisting and turning, the plot is full of dark humor, but can also leave you shocked at times (let’s not elaborate on that, we want to keep it spoil free).

Why should you add this to your tbr pile?

Sam Hooker’s writing reminded me, in essence, a lot of Lemony Snicket’s Series of Unfortunate Events, mixed with a humorous 007 story plot. The Old Country has something strongly Orwellian about it, giving the story a larger depth, while showing that a humorous mystery tale can also reveal many, many ugly truths about society. That being said, it would be a book to recommend for all of the fiction lovers out there. Pick up the book, follow Peril through his perilous adventures, and get lost in a world of strange habits, strange people, and strange happenings.

Peril in the Old Country comes out on June 5th, 2018. Mark your calendars, book dragons!